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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
accused of plotting a terror attack on u.s. soil. a live report coming up. >>> nasa struggling to find its footing after retiring the shuttle program. we'll take a look at a new study suggesting that underfunding could threaten america's future in space. >> all three engines up and burning. two, one, zero and lift-off, the finalist off of atlantis on the shoulders of the space shuttle. america will continue the dream. jon: that was the final space shuttle launch july 8th, 2011 signaling the end of an era for nasa. federal funding for the space agency has fallen flat. it has come under constant threats of more cuts in recent years. a new study suggests that underfunding and lack of focus could lead to nasa's demise. despite the mars rover curiosity and president's calls for manned missions to mars, nasa appears to be losing its edge in space exploration? we have tom jones, four times former shuttle as snow naught for nasa and planetary scientist. what do you think of nasa's problems? at this point there are no plans to return humans to space until 2020, is that right, tom? >> americans are
't. joining us now on the phone retired u.s. air force colonel, current nasa astronauts dr. coleman spent more than 4,000 hours in space aboard the space shuttle columbia on board the international space station, she's done it all. dr. coleman, katie, great to have you here. >> it's nice to be there. >> jamie: what is that anniversary, that date, today, mean to you? >> well, the fact that it's 40 years since apollo 17, in some ways, it seems like such a big number and yet, i think that what we've done in the meantime is just simply amazing and to think back this is the last time that we had people that walked on the moon, whatever we had one of these anniversaries, i call a friend of mine, andy tinken, wrote "a man on the moon", what were they thinking, what was it like for them. what kind of a mission. apparently apollo 17 broke all the records, it was the longest mission and they brought back the most lunar samples and longest time in lunar orbit and simply amazing mission and so, you know, in early december here in 2012 to celebrate 40 years, it makes me really proud of what i do today. >>
nasa works and so many others have not, my fear, though, we would not have had the same liberty then if we were dealing with the same debt we were today and, yet, you are now compounding it by arguing for more spending. >> the whole discussion around the fiscal cliff is a stimulus program, rather stimulus by further tax cut but a 98 percent or for 100 percent, whether stimulus by extending the payroll --. >>neil: where is the stimulus in extending rates that are already there. >>guest: why, why, why are economists saying we could have a recession without dealing with the cliff live? by taking so much money out of the market by people who would be spending it or by cutting government spending, either by too large an increase in taxes or by too large a cut in government spending, they are saying that would reverse the economic recovery. the whole package was packaged. >>neil: let me ask where we stand now. i wanted to cut to the chase, and whether you think a deal will be done and what it will look like. >>guest: we will do a deal and we will do a deal that week between christmas
probably saw a really cool image. a nighttime view of the earth from space. nasa was able to show us this image, thanks to a new satellite equipped with something called visible infrared imaging radiometer suite. but this image of the globe from space is not what you might think it is. we do not have a camera far enough away from earth to get an image of the whole thing. it's a composite knitted together from data taken by the satellite as it made several passes around the earth. lots of the cool pictures you see like of hurricanes from earth are actually composites. anything close enough to the earth to be held by its gravitational pull is also too close to get a whole earth picture. for perspective, this is what the earth looks like from the international space station. you can't really see the whole thing at once. only a couple dozen earthlings have ever been far enough from the earth to see the whole thing. like the crew of apollo 8, who took this picture commonly known as "earth rise" from the window of the craft as they orbited the moon in 1968. unfortunately, nearly half the e
for what was your final mission to the moon 40 years ago today. we'll talk with a former nasa astronaut. >> hippi 2, y hoppity. da-da-da. hippity hopping along. falcon 109. i couldn't have that, bob. it's just too beautiful. [ loud party sounds ] hi, i'm ensure clear... clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've gotine grams of protein. that's three times more than me! [ female announcer ] ensure clear. nine grams protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-f
40 years since that historic scene. the final nasa mission sending a man to walk on the moon. last person to do that. he is the commander of a apollo 17 and the last ever made on the moon's surface leaving a special legacy for america's space program. joining us live. captain eugene cernan and last man to walk on the moon. i can't tell you how excited i was to talk to you today. thank you for joining us. >> you are welcome heather. you might have guessed i had no requests for auditions. >> heather: did you plan ahead what you were going sing and what you were going to do? >> no, we didn't. we plan ahead all we're going to from a scientific, but everything else you heard from most of these missions, your reaction to the environment and reaction to things. even things that were said when we left the moon, they come to you because of what you are confronted with. >> heather: explain to us. take us all back there that moment when you first stepped foot on the to the moon surface. what did you see and what did it feel like? >> well, heather, my first step was mine. no matter what a lot
. it looks even better in hd. they didn't have that 40 years ago, did they. captain gene cernan former nasa astronaut with us now. n her, il by the way is hosting this. traveled all over the country to conduct these interviews. it's great to have you. gene, i just want you to tell our audience, if you can, what you want them to understand about what was done then, four decades ago. >> all right. you know, this -- today, as a matter of fact, bill, is the launch date 40 years ago, and in a week it will be 40 years since those final steps, and what i really want to have happen, we've got almost two full generation, a half of seven tour reef young men and young women in a country today who neither weren't born when neil walked on the moon or diapers or knee pants when i made the last steps. i want to remind them what happened in this country from alan shepard's first steps into space when actually i look them as the first steps on the moon when we didn't even know we were going, and what it took this country, the dead today indication, the commitment of hundreds of thousands of people in this c
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)